Energy efficiency is not just low-hanging fruit; it is fruit on the ground. Stephen Chu, US Secretary of Energy
  • The use of sensors within horticulture is hardly a recent development, with thermometers, measuring boxes and Carbon Dioxide sensors having been used for decades. However, the advent of wireless sensing technology, as well as the reduction in prices of such equipment, means data collection is now cheaper and easier than ever before.
  • The UK soft fruit sector continues to expand due to consumer preference for local production utilising an extended growing season. Most often this has been by the implementation of single span ‘Spanish’ tunnels, together with new varieties and substrate crops in gutters or on table-tops irrigated using hydroponic irrigation systems.
  • Screens have become an essential tool for energy saving, shading and climate control in modern protected horticulture. New screen materials which save more heat energy and transmit more light have been developed, enabling screens to be deployed more in the daytime, or in double layers.
  • Jon Swain went on behalf of GrowSave to GreenTech, Amsterdam RAI to see what’s new and here are some photos and videos of what he found.
  • Screens have become an essential tool for energy saving, shading and climate control in modern protected horticulture. New screen materials which save more heat energy and transmit more light have been developed, enabling screens to be deployed more in the daytime, or in double layers.
  • At the end of February 2014, twenty growers and horticultural industry professionals from the UK visited Ontario and British Columbia on a greenhouse horticulture study tour, organised by the GrowSave team. The group visited 14 organisations which comprised of nurseries, R&D facilities and industry suppliers.
  • The idea of a semi-sealed greenhouse was a natural development from the completely-sealed greenhouse that was pioneered over 10 years ago. In this Technical Update, we look at the advantages and disadvantages of a semi-sealed greenhouse system, and what the future holds.
  • Controlling humidity can be expensive in energy terms, yet it is essential for the control of fungal disease and to ensure active plant growth. Humidity control also needs to be carefully targeted so as not to negate the energy savings from measures such as temperature integration (TI) and thermal screens.